Archive for November, 2010

The nascent trend of five years ago is rapidly becoming the model of today. More & more pharma research is focused on joining forces with universities. The rationale is simple and brilliant; With the ever escalating costs of R & D and the ‘patent cliff’ fast approaching, the merger of resources is a natural wellspring of mutual benefits.

Big pharma needs new drug discoveries and more cost effective ways of discovering them. 80% of all FDA approved drugs have generic counter-parts, according to the 2010 Kaiser Foundation report on prescription drug trends. Add to this the fast approaching edge of the “patent cliff” (2011-2015) when dozens of brand name drugs go off patent, including six of the ten largest medicines in the U.S. and you get a good idea of the challenges facing the ‘business’ of big pharma. Viagara, Actos, Symbicort, Crestor and Avandia are just a few major brands to face generic competition soon.

Partnering with universities will offer big pharma alternate approaches to their on-going research…access to new and experimental technologies, creative thought processes indigenous to the university environment…more cost efficient continued development of in-license drug candidates…fresh stimulus for stalled projects…the potential of discovering multiple, new applications for existing drugs…all in an arena that could offer new, more rapid research platforms for the discovery and release of better medicines.

In this win-win collaboration, universities will be able to analyze pharma’s extensive and diverse data…and data is what it’s all about in the research and development of new drugs. An example of this trend is Sanofi’s recent announcement to collaborate with Harvard in diabetes and cancer research.  As pharma gleans new & improved information from institutional partners, so too do those institutions gain precious access to pharma’s previously locked treasure chest of health science research.

It’s a natural collaboration, taking place on a global scale. A marriage of necessity expected to bring forth a new generation of blockbuster progeny.

The most populated country in the world is fully engaging the issues of healthcare reform. The cornerstone of the newly emerging system is patient data. The organization, storage and management of health records will ultimately maximize the benefits of patient care and cost efficiency.
The WSJ underscores the importance:  “China’s health-care IT market will see remarkable growth in the next five years, triggered partly by China’s three year” health-care reform program, said Janet Chiew, analyst for research firm IDC. IDC estimates the market will reach $2.4 billion in 2013 and grow at an average 19.9% per year.”

Data storage and analysis capabilities will be further driven as the influx of new medical devices and diagnostic equipment continues to surge ahead. According to one report, China’s overall medical equipment market is expected to double between now and 2015 to reach over $53 billion.  This steady increase of new medical equipment will generate massive amounts of new patient data and a concurrent need for real-time access. It is not inconceivable that patient data could more than double in a decade.

Before the information from new diagnostic equipment can be transformed in to cost saving health-care analytics, the existing systems of paper based patient records must become electronic records. This is the first step for eliminating expensive redundancies and delays in gathering patient data. Database technology and storage solutions from IBM and others are already being deployed throughout China and have been for some time.

In Guangdong province, a group of high volume hospitals are implementing a program called CHAS, or Clinical and Health Records Analytics and Sharing. One such hospital focused on traditional Chinese medicine has more than 10,000 patient visits per day. Deployment of the new health-care analytics technology in this hospital is expected by the year-end.

China’s health-care reform offers data storage and analysis technology its largest opportunity yet for developing and deploying solutions…solutions that will have global impact on reducing costs and improving patient care.